Fedy’s installation of Brackets bricks your Fedora installation

I wanted to give Fedy a try yesterday, specifically to install the Brackets code editor designed for web developers. I’m pretty lazy when it comes to install external packages (from the Brackets.io’s homepage it looked like only a DEB file was available) and after asking a few friends who made heavy use of Fedy in the past about its stability and credibility I went ahead and followed the provided instructions to set it up. [Read More]

Fedora 20 on a Samsung Chronos Series 7

It’s been a while now since the very first time I posed my hands on this shiny new Samsung Chronos Series 7 laptop and oh dear… how much pain did my metallic-grey fellow take me in order to figure out how properly have every single piece of the hardware working as expected? What I did right after unboxing it was dropping Windows 8 with a copy of Fedora 20 (yeah, stupid me, I could have booted Windows 8 at least once to check for UEFI / firmware updates) and setting everything up as usual. [Read More]

Manage passwords with ‘pass’

Fighting with passwords have always been one of my favorite battles in the past and unfortunately the former always won. I never liked using the root user that much for administering a machine and made a massive use of sudo, I won’t list all the benefits of using sudo, but the following wiki page has a pretty nice overview of them. Said that, when using sudo it’s definitely ideal to combine a strong password that is also easy to remember and type again when prompted. [Read More]

Configuring DNSSEC on your personal domain

Today I’ll be working out how to properly configure DNSSEC on a BIND9 installation, I’ll also make sure to give you all the needed instructions to properly verify if a specific domain is being correctly covered by DNSSEC itself. In addition to that a few more details will be provided about adding the relevant SSHFP‘s entries on your DNS zone files to be able to automatically verify the authenticity of your domain when connecting to it with SSH avoiding any possible MITM attack. [Read More]
BIND  DNSSEC 

Back from GUADEC 2013

I wanna be really honest, getting back home from this year’s GUADEC has been very painful for me but not because of the trip back home. I had such a very good time at Brno that I actually wanted to stay there for way more days! I must admit that I’ve been missing the italian food for a while until Mattias Bengtsson suggested me to try having a dinner at the “Flavours” indian restaurant. [Read More]

Two years later: Vim, Tmux and my Linux desktop

It’s been two years since my latest blog post about my Linux desktop and many things have changed since then. I completely moved all my machines to GNOME 3, switched my main editor from nano to vim and my terminal multiplexer from screen to tmux. What didn’t change at all except for a tweaks on the theme is my Irssi setup. Switching from nano to vim has been a pain at first, nano is really a straightforward editor, it does what you actually need from a CLI editor but while it works just fine when modifying configuration or text files, it’s a bit limiting when it comes to programming. [Read More]

A second round of updates from the GNOME Sysadmin Team

I haven’t been blogging so much in the past months as I actually promised myself I would have but given the fact a lot has been done on the GNOME Infrastructure lately it’s time for me to announce all the updates we did since my latest blog post. So here we come with all the items we’ve been looking at recently: Our main LDAP istance was moved from a very ancient machine (which unfortunately died with a broken disk a few weeks ago) to a newer box that currently contains several other admin tools like Mango and Daily Reports. [Read More]

Setting up your SSL certificates on OpenLDAP by using a Mozilla NSS database

I’ve recently spent some time setting up TLS/SSL encryption (SSSD won’t send a password in clear text when an user will try to authenticate against your LDAP server) on an OpenLDAP istance and as you may know the only way for doing that on a RHEL / CentOS environment is dealing with a Mozilla NSS database (which is, in fact, a SQLite database). I’ve been reading all the man pages of the relevant tools available to manipulate Mozilla NSS databases and I thought I would have shared the whole procedure and commands I used to achieve my goal. [Read More]

Some updates from the GNOME Sysadmin Team

It’s been more than a month now since I started looking into the many outstanding items we had waiting on our To Do list here at the GNOME Infrastructure. A lot has been done and a lot has yet to come during the next months, but I would like to share with you some of the things I managed to look at during these weeks. As you may understand many Sysadmin’s tasks are not perceived at all by users especially the ones related to the so-called “Puppet-ization” which refers to the process of creating / modifying / improving our internal Puppet repository. [Read More]

IPv6 tunneling with Hurricane Electrics (HE)

I’ve been looking around for a possible way to connect to the IPv6 internet for some time now and given the fact my provider didn’t allow me to run IPv6 natively I had to find an alternative solution. Hurricane Electrics (HE) provides (for free) five configurable IPv4-to-IPv6 tunnels together with a free DNS service and an interesting certification program. Willing to test the latest revision of the Internet Protocol on your Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora machines? [Read More]